3 Ways Entrepreneurs Can Sabotage Business Coaching Success

Are You Your Own Worst Enemy?

In the previous post, I discussed “4 Things to Watch Out For Before Hiring a Business or Life Coach.” In this third installment of my expose on the coaching industry, I will be addressing ways entrepreneurs can sabotage their own success with a coach. It is not always the coach’s fault. There are times when, we- meaning me- enter into agreements when were are not ready. The following are three ways entrepreneurs can become their own worst enemy when seeking a business coach.

3 Ways Entrepreneurs Can Sabotage Coaching Success

1. Lack of Due Diligence

I once heard someone say that poor people take a long time to move while rich people make quick decisions. After hearing this repeated ad nauseum by a few people in the coaching industry, I convinced myself I had to make quick decisions in order to prove I wanted success. I found myself getting into programs and groups- usually pre-maturely- because I needed to show I could “run with the big dogs.” To prove I was ready, I jumped on a few “limited time” offers I should have ignored.

Taking the time to actually think before you act is not a poor person’s move, it is an intelligent person’s move. Taking time does not necessarily entail months or years, but it means that you give yourself ample opportunity to think before you buy. The time you take could be used to handle important matters such as adequately researching the potential coach or creating a realistic budget for the expense. Rushing into a program to prove I was ready to “take it to the next level” or “invest in myself” led to inadequate research of coaches and their offerings.

When I first started my business, I hired a great business start-up coach to help me in the beginning phases. This was my second time around being an entrepreneur, but I wanted this time to be different. In retrospect, I should have taken more time after my job ended before retaining the services, because it was clear from some of my subsequent choices I was not mentally prepared to start a business.  Nine months later, I am able to truly process and implement what my start-up business coach taught me in the beginning, however, I could have saved myself a lot of frustration post-start-up dealings with unfruitful associations if I had taken the time to stop, breathe, and think before making decisions earlier in this journey.

2. Being a Sucker

“You need to invest in yourself” is one of the statements I often heard from those in the coaching industry. I later learned in a training that this was a marketing gimmick taught by top money making marketers who train other coaches and experts. It is employed to induce entrepreneurs to part with their money without taking time to really process the information. It is true that your business will require that you spend money. It is not true, however, that you are not serious about your business- or yourself- if you choose to forgo a coaching program until you are mentally and financially ready. I was suckered in by this line because it usually came on the heels of the “only poor people take a long time to move” chant.

You will have to invest in your business, but that doesn’t mean you need to do it right now. Besides, there are other ways to invest. It’s called sweat equity. I know that entrepreneurs are often told we won’t be successful doing it ourselves, but there are times where this may be the most appropriate course of action. Throwing money at a situation can only take you so far. You can invest all the money you want and still not accomplish one thing because you are not walking in your purpose. This leads me to my third failure.

3. Being Unfaithful to You

When you know your purpose, don’t apologize for it; don’t back down from it because someone wants to steer you in a different direction. Whatever your reason is for not standing-up for yourself, eliminate it. When you are out of purpose, you are out of order. When you are out of order, you will fail. Additionally, don’t let someone stroke your ego about using credentials you don’t want to use to open doors to rooms you don’t want to enter. 

I knew my purpose, but I was not firm with seasoned entrepreneurs who insisted I take a different path. In other words, I was a wimp. I finally remedied this situation by opening my mouth. It wasn’t until my inner-voice told me that I didn’t have to do anything other than what I was called to do, that the fire I had when I first started this new chapter was re-ignited and I took a stand for me. You can keep your fire alive by remaining true to you.

Be strong, be courageous, and go possess your land. You don’t have to be your own worst enemy.

In the fourth part of this series, I will be discussing some suggestions that entrepreneurs for repairing the image of the coaching industry.

Series Posts

An Expose into the Coaching Industry

4 Things to Watch Out For Before Hiring a Business or Life Coach

12 Things Business Coaches Can Do to Repair the Industry’s Image

 

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